Students as partners in learning and teaching: The benefits of co-creation of the curriculum

  • Tanya Michelle Lubicz-Nawrocka University of Edinburgh
Keywords: Partnership, Co-Creation of the Curriculum, Negotiated Curriculum, Supercomplexity, Self-Authorship

Abstract

This research explores the benefits of co-creation of the curriculum, which is seen as one form of student-staff partnership in learning and teaching in which each partner has a voice and a stake in curriculum development. This qualitative research analyses participants’ perceptions of co-creation of the curriculum in the Scottish higher-education sector. Initial findings show that some staff and students participating in co-creation of the curriculum perceive it to benefit them by (a) fostering the development of shared responsibility, respect, and trust; (b) creating the conditions for partners to learn from each other within a collaborative learning community; and (c) enhancing individuals’ satisfaction and personal development within higher education. Using Barnett’s conceptualisation of supercomplexity and Baxter Magolda’s three-pronged view of self-authorship, the author suggests that critical and democratic engagement in co-creation of the curriculum can develop the self-authorship of both students and staff members, including their cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal abilities which help them adapt to an ever-changing, supercomplex world.

Author Biography

Tanya Michelle Lubicz-Nawrocka, University of Edinburgh
Tanya Lubicz-Nawrocka is a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh. Her doctoral research focuses on student empowerment through student/staff partnerships in co-creating the curriculum, and examining the impact of these partnerships on individuals and their communities.

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Published
2018-05-07
How to Cite
Lubicz-Nawrocka, T. (2018). Students as partners in learning and teaching: The benefits of co-creation of the curriculum. International Journal for Students As Partners, 2(1), 47-63. https://doi.org/10.15173/ijsap.v2i1.3207
Section
Research Articles